Saturday, July 31, 2010

The Royal Report for Sunday August 1st, 2010 - Tribute to Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother

On August 4th, 2010 would have marked Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother's 110th birthday. On this episode, a look back at this remarkable woman and her impact on the royal family.

You can listen to the episode here

Royal Podcasts mentioned

The Royal Report on iTunes

RoyaltyNow!

Memories of Diana

Queen Victoria - The English Programme

The Royal Collection Podcast

Publications mentioned

Hello! Canada Weekly No 182 9 August 2010

Someday My Prince Will Come: True Adventures of a Wannabe Princess by Jerramy Fine

Elizabeth, The Queen Mother by Hugo Vickers

The Queen Mother: The Official Biography by William Shawcross

From My Royal Collection

Queen Victoria's Family: A Century of Photographs by Charlotte Zeepvat

Tune in to the next episode of The Royal Report on Sunday August 8, 2010 at 9:00PM EST (North America)

The topic will be: An update on Prince William and Kate Middleton - Are we any closer to a royal engagement?

© Marilyn Braun 2010

Saturday, July 24, 2010

The Royal Report for Sunday July 25th, 2010 - Should Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie lose their royal titles?

As granddaughters of the Sovereign in the male line, Prince Andrew's daughters are styled HRH Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie. Yet there is talk of removing these royal titles and making them Ladies instead. Should they lose their royal titles?

Find out by listening to this episode

Publications mentioned

Hello! Canada Weekly No 180 19 July 2010

Hello! Canada Weekly No 181 26 July 2010

Memoirs of a Radical Lawyer by Michael Mansfield


Blogs and websites mentioned

World of Royalty Blog

World of Royalty Website

From My Royal Collection

The Royal Encyclopedia -Edited by Ronald Allison and Sarah Riddell

Tune in to the next episode of

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Royal Focus: Queen Elizabeth II's Royal Wedding Dress

Queen Elizabeth II, as Princess Elizabeth, and her husband the Duke of Edinburgh, styled Prince Philip in 1957, on their wedding day. She became queen on her father King George VI's death in 1952.   (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) When Queen Elizabeth II, at the time Princess Elizabeth, married in 1947, her wedding dress was a stunning creation despite the post war austerity and strict rationing laws. Princess Elizabeth herself was not exempt from the rationing and reportedly saved her clothing coupons for her wedding dress. She received an extra two hundred coupons from the government and many loyal subjects sent in their own coupons. However, it was illegal to give away clothing coupons and the princess returned them to their rightful owners with a note of thanks.

The wedding dress was made by Norman Hartnell and the design was inspired by an image of Primavera by the painter Botticelli. The figure, with its trailing garlands of jasmine, smilax, syringa and rose-like blossoms - was derived from the classical godess of flowers, Flora, and suggested to him the promise of growth and new beginnings.

Hartnell started work on the dress in August, a mere three months before the wedding in November. Although he was no stranger to designing dresses for royalty, this comission had its share of unique challenges and he had to white-wash the windows of his workroom to keep the dress under wraps. Requiring some materials from the United States, Hartnell sent his manager, Captain Mitchison in his place. Upon his return, when asked if he had anything to declare, Captain Mitchison replied that he had 10,000 pearls for Princess Elizabeth's wedding dress. When the chosen fabric for the dress was publicized, some demanded to know the nationality of the silkworms; whether they were from 'enemy' territories such as Japan or Italy. A crisis was averted when it was confirmed that the larvae had been supplied by China.

13th November 1947:  A drawing by Norman Hartnell of Princess Elizabeth's (later Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain) wedding dress.  (Photo by Arthur Tanner/Fox Photos/Getty Images)
Despite these obstacles the dress was a triumph. Decorated with 10,000 pearls, the ivory dress of duchess satin was in the Princess style with a fitted bodice and the neckline had a deep-scalloped edge. The front bodice was cut in three panels and the back cut in four, fastening down the centre back with buttons and loops. The wrist-length, tight-fitting  sleeves ended in embroidered cuffs. From the low-pointed waist, the skirt, cut on the cross, extended to a deep circular train.

LONDON - JULY 27:  Princess Elizabeth's wedding dress, designed by Norman Hartnell, and the Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Naval uniform are displayed at the 'Royal Wedding: 20 Novermber 1957'  exhibition at Buckingham Palace on July 27, 2007 in London. Queen Elizabeth II will be the first reigning sovereign to celebrate a 60th wedding anniversary. This new exhibition will mark the occasion by recreating the day in 1947 when Princess Elizabeth married The Duke of Edinburgh at Westminster Abbey. The collection of archive film footage, behind the scenes preparations, dresses, jewels and gifts reflect the mood of public rejoicing that swept the nation in the immediate aftermath of World War II.  (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)The 15-foot star patterned silk tulle train, fastened at the shoulders was embroidered with crystal and appliqué duchesse satin  Working with his head embroideress, Hartnell laid tracing paper out on his workroom floor and carefully marked out the pattern in pencil. The white York roses were padded satin, and the ears of corn and orange blossom in diamante and pearl embroidery, inspired by Primavera. The long veil was held in place by a diamond fringe tiara, lent to the Princess, as something borrowed, by her mother, the Queen. She wore two pearl necklaces (the Queen Anne and the Queen Caroline pearls) given as a wedding gift by her parents, and pearl and diamond earrings, a twentieth birthday present from Queen Mary.

She wore ivory duchesse satin high-heeled sandals, trimmed with silver and seed pearl buckles, made by Edward Rayne. Her floral bouquet was supplied by the Worshipful Company of Gardeners and made by Martin Longman, consisted of white orchids with a sprig of myrtle, taken, as per royal wedding tradition, from a bush at Osbourne.
© Marilyn Braun 2010

Wedding dress images from PicApp.

Primavera by Botticelli image via Wikipedia.

Friday, July 16, 2010

Royal Focus: The Cullinan V Heart Brooch

KAMPALA, UGANDA - NOVEMBER 22:  HRH Queen Elizabeth II smiles as she tours the Mildmay centre for AIDS Orphans on November 22, 2007 in Kampala, Uganda. The Queen will open the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting on Friday. CHOGM will be attended by over 5000 delegates, The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall as well as UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown.  (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)The diamond in the Cullinan V Heart Brooch is part of the famous Cullinan cleavings.

The original Cullinan diamond was named after the owner of the Premier mine, Sir Thomas M. Cullinan. The stone was discovered in 1905 by the Superintendent of the mine, who originally thought the stone was nothing more than a piece of broken glass, he dug the rock out. The diamond weighed 3,106 carats and was given to King Edward VII as a 'token of loyalty'. The King accepted the stone 'for myself and sucessors'.

The stone was cleaved into two pieces weighing 1,977.5 carats and the other weighing 1,040 carats. A further cleaving  resulted in nine major stones, known as 'chips'. Some of the chips became part of the Crown Jewels: the pear-shaped Star of Africa (Cullinan I) set into the royal sceptre and the other set into the Imperial State Crown (Cullinan II) . The Cullinan III and Cullinan IV - known as the Lesser Stars of Africa were set as a brooch and is the single most valuable item in the Queen's collection.  She refers to them as 'Granny's chips'. Other stones were set into the Cullinan VII and Cullinan VIII brooches, as well as a marquise shaped ring (Cullinan IX).

One of the chips was used to make the Cullinan V Heart Brooch. The diamond, an 18.8 carat heart-shaped stone, was put into a heart-shaped platinum setting , the collets in the brooch designed to accentuate the shape of the diamond. It was worn frequently by Queen Mary and is said to be one of The Queen's favorite pieces.  

© Marilyn Braun 2010

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Royal Focus: The Prince Albert Brooch

401511 18: Britains Queen Elizabeth II smiles at the crowds of well wishers lining the Waitemata Plaza walkway February 26, 2002 in Auckland, New Zealand. The Queen and her husband the Duke of Edinburgh are in New Zealand for six days before travelling to Australia on February 27. (Photo by Dean Treml/Getty Images)

This large oblong sapphire is surrounded by twelve round diamonds. It was given to Queen Victoria by Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha the day before their wedding. For their wedding she wore the brooch with a diamond necklace and earrings and always referred to the jewel as 'Albert's brooch'.

While Prince Albert was alive, Queen Victoria wore it constantly and inexpensive reproductions of it were made for those subjects who wanted to purchase a version of the brooch.  After his death in 1861 she rarely wore it. In her she instructed that it be considered a Crown piece of jewellery, held in trust for all future Queen consorts. Queen Alexandra wore it pinned to her shoulder for her coronation in 1902. Queen Mary wore it often, but Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother was rarely seen wearing it. The brooch is a favorite of the present Queen. Prince Albert made copies of the brooch for his daughters and the present Queen gave one of these to her daughter, Princess Anne.

© Marilyn Braun 2010

Monday, July 12, 2010

Royal Focus: The Queen's flame lily brooch

Jun. 05, 2010 - Epsom, Surrey, United Kingdom - epa02188305 Queen Elizabeth II of the UK arrives during the Investec Derby meeting at Epsom racecourse, Surrey, southern England, on 05 June 2010. The Epsom Derby is one of the five British Classic Races. It goes without saying that The Queen has one of the most remarkable collection of jewels in the world. Many of the brooches have a history behind them, such as the Flame lily brooch she wears in this photo.

The Flame lily brooch was amongst the gifts that The Queen, as Princess Elizabeth, received for her twenty-first birthday during her tour of Southern Africa in 1947. Set with three hundred diamonds, the platinum 'Flame lily' brooch was a gift from forty-two thousand Southern Rhodesian school children, who had each donated a week's pocket money.

The shape of the brooch was appropriate, as the flame lily was the national emblem of Rhodesia. In order to make a perfect replica of the lily, which varies in color, a flower had to be specially flown to South Africa where an artist worked against time to complete the reference drawings before it wilted.

It was presented to her during the royal tour at Government House. The next day the Princess wore the brooch on her left shoulder, a compliment that was appreciated by all of those involved in making it. During Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh's trip to Kenya in 1952, her father King George VI died. When the new Queen returned from South Africa, she wore the brooch pinned to the lapel of her black coat.

© Marilyn Braun 2010

Thursday, July 08, 2010

The Royal Tour 2010 - The Queen's Jewels

One of the noticeable things about the Queen's appearance is her ubiquitous pearl button earrings, her multi-strand pearl necklace and her brooches. Brooches may have long gone out of fashion as an everyday fashion staple, but not so with the Queen, who has worn several different brooches during her tour of Canada.

HALIFAX, NS - JUNE 29: Queen Elizabeth II attends a reception for 'A Celebration of Novia Scotia' at the Cunard Centre on June 29, 2010 in Halifax, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th, the royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images)
During a reception in Halifax, The Queen wears what appears to be a newer brooch from her collection. Paying a compliment to Canada, the gold brooch is a branch with red enamel maple-leafs and at the bottom of the branch is a small pearl. A lovely piece, almost shaped like a corsage, she would wear it again later on in the tour during a visit to the Research in Motion Blackberry factory in Waterloo, Ontario. 
Great Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip (not shown0 arrive at Parliament Hill as guests of honor for Canada Day celebrations in Ottawa, Ontario, July 1, 2010. The royal couple are on day four of their nine day Royal Tour of Canada. UPI/Heinz Ruckemann Photo via Newscom

Fittingly enough for Canada Day the Queen wore her Maple Leaf brooch - the national symbol of Canada. The large diamond-encrusted maple leaf brooch, was originally presented to Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother when she first visited Canada in 1939. The gift of a maple leaf brooch follows a long-standing tradition. In 1901, the future Queen Mary, visited Canada on a seven-month-long tour where she was given an enamel maple leaf spray. In 1923, Queen Elizabeth, the future Queen Mother received as a wedding gift a gold maple leaf brooch set with diamonds.



Great Britain's Queen Elizabeth meets with Michael Ignatieff the leader of the Opposition, federal Liberal party at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, Ontario, July 2, 2010. The Queen and Prince Philip are on day five of their nine day Royal Tour of Canada. UPI/Pool/Neil Valois Photo via Newscom
Not as easily visible in this photo the Queen wears the Duchess of Cambridge's Pendant brooch for her private meeting with Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff. A baroque pearl in a diamond-set Mount hangs from a diamond pendant below a large round pearl framed by fourteen brilliant-cut diamonds. The brooch, originally belonged to Queen Mary's grandmother, Princess Augusta, Duchess of Cambridge, who was painted wearing it as early as 1877. This brooch was one of Queen Mary's favorites and the present Queen inherited it in 1953.

WINNIPEG, MB - JULY 03: Queen Elizabeth II l smiles as she arrives at the new James Armstrong Richardson International airport on July 3, 2010 in Winnipeg, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th The royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images)
In this photo, taken in Winnipeg, the Queen wears the Williamson diamond brooch, made for The Queen by Cartier in 1952, as a setting for the world's largest 54.5-carat pink diamond she had been given as a wedding gift in 1947 by John T, Williamson. The diamond had been discovered in Dr Williamson's mine in Tanganyika in the month before the royal wedding. In 1948 it was cut into a 23.6-carat brilliant in London and later set into this daffodil flower brooch - rumored to be one of the Queen's favorite flowers.  



TORONTO, ON - JULY 04: Queen Elizabeth II leaves the Sunday Service at the Cathedral Church of St James on July 4, 2010 in Toronto, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th The royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)In this photo, taken just outside of St James Cathedral in Toronto the Queen appears to be wearing the Jubilee brooch.  Originally given to Queen Victoria from  'The Ladies and Gentlemen of Her Majesty's Household in celebration of her Diamond Jubilee in 1897. It is a festoon design of diamonds with a pearl centre. It had a pearl drop hanging from a looped chain of diamond collets but this appears to have been removed. Queen Victoria left the brooch to the Crown in 1901. It was frequently worn by the present Queen's mother, the late Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, who had an affinity for diamonds and particularly pearls.

TORONTO, ON - JULY 05: Queen Elizabeth II gives a speech during a dinner at the Royal York Hotel on July 5, 2010 in Toronto, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th, the royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)In this photo, the Queen wears Queen Mary's 'Girls of Great Britain and Ireland' tiara. She received this as a wedding gift from her grandmother, Queen Mary, in 1947 and it has been referred to affectionately as 'Granny's tiara.'

She is wearing Queen Victoria's Collet Necklace and the King George VI diamond Chandelier Earrings. Ending in three drops, these earrings show every known modern cut of diamond. Like her tiara, she received these as a wedding gift in 1947. In this photo she is most definitely wearing the Jubilee brooch, this time with the pearl drop pendant attached.


NEW YORK - JULY 06: Queen Elizabeth II smiles as she visits the British Garden at Hanover Square on July 6, 2010 in New York City. Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh have just completed an eight day tour of Canada and the visit to New York is final day before the royal couple head back to the UK. After paying a historic visit to the United Nations they will visit ground zero and the British Memorial Garden. The Queen last addressed the United Nations in 1957 and it will be the first time she has visited ground zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images)
In this photo, taken during her brief visit to New York City, she wears her Aquamarine and diamond Cartier clips. Combining baguette, oval and round stones, these clips were given to the Queen in 1944 as an eighteenth birthday present by her parents. They can be worn as a single brooch or as two separate matching clips, as she wears them in the photo.

© Marilyn Braun 2010

All photos via PicApp

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

The Royal Tour - Day Nine

Great Britain's Queen Elizabeth speaks to guests as she and Prince Philip attend a dinner hosted by the Government of Canada at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto, Ontario, July 5, 2010. The Royal couple are on day eight of their nine day Royal Tour of Canada. UPI/Heinz Ruckemann Photo via Newscom Ahh, all good things must come to an end, on this, the last day of her visit to Canada.

She had attended a state dinner the night before at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto. Looking lovely as always, she brought out the tiara and priceless jewels. But it was not the jewels that people noted but the gown she was wearing: a long white lace gown adorned with sequins and pearls around the neckline and a glittering maple leaf appliquéd to the shoulder. Yet another fashion tribute to Canada. (Oh, stop Your Majesty, you're making us blush!)
Great Britain's Queen Elizabeth receives flowers during her walk about as she and Prince Philip attend their official departure ceremony at Queen's Park in Toronto, Ontario, July 6, 2010. The Royal couple are leaving for the United States after their nine day Royal Tour of Canada. UPI/Heinz Ruckemann Photo via Newscom

Looking sprightly despite the heat and late-evening, the Queen was ready for the 21-gun salute at Ontario's Legislature, afterwards unveiling the last plaque of her visit: commemorating the 150th anniversary of the dedication of Queen's Park by her great-grandfather, before he was crowned King Edward VII.

She then headed to Pearson International Airport for a badge ceremony with Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Gov. Gen. Michaelle Jean before departing on an Airbus bound for New York City.

Given her age, there is some discussion regarding whether this will be her last visit to Canada. I like to think that it isn't. During her 2005 visit I had the same thoughts and yet she visited us again and she is reportedly scheduled to return in 2012 to mark her Diamond Jubilee.

Let's hope that's true!

© Marilyn Braun 2010

The Royal Tour of Canada - Day Eight

Britain's Queen Elizabeth looks at a gift, a handheld Blackberry device, at Research in Motion in Kitchener, Ontario July 5, 2010. Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty (R) accompanied the Queen on a tour of the RIM manufacturing facility and is showing her how it operates. REUTERS/Fred Thornhill (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS SCI TECH BUSINESS ROYALS) Admit it. When we visit countries on vacations or for business, or for royal tours, we like taking souvenirs back with us and not declaring them. In this case, the Queen and Prince Philip toured the Research in Motion factory in Waterloo where Blackberrys are made. She was presented with one of her own, with no bells and whistles other than an image of children holding out flowers.

Will she declare it? I can see it now:

Hapless customs agent: Do you have anything to declare?

The Queen's minions: (Nervous but trying to sound casual) No, nothing other than a St James Cathedral tea towel..

Hapless customs agent: Wait a moment, didn't the Queen receive a Blackberry...Why yes she did! Here's the photographic proof!

Hapless minion sighs and begins filling out the paperwork.

© Marilyn Braun 2010

Image via PicApp

The Royal Tour of Canada - Day Seven

And on the seventh day she....went to church and the race course...

What would God think?

Britain's Queen Elizabeth receives a gift from an unidentified woman in the crowd outside St. James Cathedral in Toronto July 4, 2010, where she attended morning church services with her husband Prince Phillip.  REUTERS/Fred Thornhill (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS ROYALS) When the Queen and Prince Philip attended mass at St. James Cathedral in Toronto the pews were filled to capacity. Seems that everyone had found religion for one day. An 'security breach' occured in what was otherwise a fairly unremarkable visit when a woman broke free of the waiting crowd, and approached the Queen with a black plastic bag in her hand. The woman handed the Queen the bag and was ushered away. The contents of this 'security breach'?

A commemorative St. James Cathedral tea towel.

Maybe the woman should have used something less suspicious looking, like a white plastic bag, or an environmentally friendly reusable grocery bag. I can only imagine how this 'breach' would have been labelled had it been a small child approaching the Queen.

No such security issues occured later on in the day when the couple attended the 151st running of The Queen's Plate. The last time she had attended was in 1997. With an estimated 25,000 people in attendance, security was extremely tight. Good luck trying to get anywhere near her, even if you are a small child with an innocuous grocery bag.

TORONTO, ON - JULY 04: Jockey Eurico Rosa Da Silva bows as Queen Elizabeth II presents him with the Queen's Plate as they attend the Woodbine Racetrack for 151st Running of The Queen s Plate Stakes on July 4, 2010 in Toronto, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th The royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images) But the event was not without incident. As the Queen presented the winning trophy to the Queen's Plate winner Big Red Mike, the owner of the horse, Dom Romeo, placed his arm on the Queen's back. Oh, the horror! This is not the first time the Queen has been physically touched by a Canadian. During a previous visit in 2002 when Canadian cyclist Louis Garneau inadvertently broke royal protocol by placing his arm around Her Majesty as his wife took a picture.

I'm wagering a guess that the Queen doesn't mind these 'incidents' and afer 84 years has learnt to take them in stride, especially when it comes from a Canadian.

Considering that she's visited Canada more often than any other Commonwealth country, why else would she keep coming back?

© Marilyn Braun 2010

The Royal Tour of Canada 2010 - Day Six

On Day Six of the tour, the Queen and Prince Philip visited the province of Manitoba before returning to Toronto later on in the evening.
WINNIPEG, MB - JULY 03: Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh arrive through a terminal air-bridge from the Royal Plane at the new James Armstrong Richardson International airport on July 3, 2010 in Winnipeg, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th The royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images) Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport welcomed its first passengers; Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II and His Royal Highness, the Duke of Edinburgh. When the Queen and Prince Philip deplaned at Bridge 7, they became the first official passengers to the airport, arriving in the new terminal, currently still under construction. 

Later on in the afternoon the Queen unveiled a statue of herself created by the late Leo Mol, Manitoba’s most famous artist and sculptor. Mol created the statue of The Queen for her visit to Manitoba in 1970. It stood in the courtyard of the Manitoba Centennial Centre, but was recently relocated to the garden of Government House.

The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh planted a shrub in the Government House garden, renamed the Queen Elizabeth II Gardens. This shrub, the Amber Jubilee Ninebark, was specially created in honour of The Queen’s upcoming Diamond Jubilee.

WINNIPEG, MB - JULY 03: Queen Elizabeth II arrives for the first Canadian concert for Human Rights on July 3, 2010 in Winnipeg, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th The royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images) Accompanied by various dignitaries, en route to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights - the first national museum created in over 40 years - The Queen and Prince Philip crossed the striking Esplanade Riel (pedestrial bridge) to arrive at The Forks, where The Queen dedicated the cornerstone for the new museum.


WINNIPEG, MB - JULY 03: Queen Elizabeth II unveils a cornerstone as she arrives at the site for Canadian Museum of Human Rights as Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh looks on on July 3, 2010 in Winnipeg, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th The royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images)For this historic dedication, The Queen used a stone from Runnymede – the site of the 1215 signing of the Magna Carta. Once officially opened in 2012, this national museum will be a national centre of learning, where Canadians and people from around the world can engage in discussion and commit to taking action against hate and oppression.

Afterwards the couple attended the Manitoba Homecoming Canadian Concert for Human Rights at The Forks, where the Queen delivered a speech.

The concert featured performances by various Manitoban performers, including Aboriginal drummers, the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, as well as Manitoba born singer Chantal Kreviazuk.

© Marilyn Braun 2010

Monday, July 05, 2010

The Royal Report for Monday July 5, 2010 - A look back at The Queen's Royal Tours of Canada

In honor of The Queen and Prince Philip's 22nd visit to Canada, a look back at their royal visits and the long association royalty has had with Canada.

You can listen to the episode here

Publications mentioned

Hello! Canada Special Collectors Edition - The Life and Times of Queen Elizabeth II Celebrating Her Majesty's Royal Visit to Canada

From My Royal Collection

Royal Canada: a History of Royal Visits to Canada Since 1786

Resources used to research this episode

Macleans Magazine Commemorative Edition Royal Visit 2010 - July 5, 2010

Queen Elizabeth II and the Royal Family in Canada (Golden Jubilee

Canada's Queen: Elizabeth II: A Celebration of Her Majestys Friendship with the People of Canada

The Royal Tour: A Souvenir Album

Royal Canada: a History of Royal Visits to Canada Since 1786

 The Royal Report is on hiatus for the next two weeks and will return on Sunday July 25th, 2010 at 9:00PM EST (North America)

Topic to be determined

© Marilyn Braun 2010

Sunday, July 04, 2010

The Royal Report for Sunday July 4, 2010 POSTPONED

The Royal Report for Sunday July 4th, 2010 has been POSTPONED to Monday July 5, 2010 at 9:00PM EST

The topic will be: In honor of the Queen and Prince Philip's visit to Canada, a look back at their tours of Canada.


© Marilyn Braun 2010

The Royal Tour of Canada - Day Four and Five

Aside from the Vancouver Olympics, where is the best place to put your Canadian pride on display? In our nation's capital on the 143rd birthday of Canada! To top it all off we had the Queen of Canada to celebrate right along with us!

OTTAWA, ON - JULY 01: Queen Elizabeth II and Prime Minister of Canada Stephen Harper arrive on stage for the Canada Day celebrations on Parliament Hill on July 1, 2010 in Ottawa, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th the Royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images) The Queen arrived in an open, horse-drawn landau, patriotically dressed in a red chiffon dress with a diamond maple leaf brooch, and a white hat with red flower. Ladies from the Royal family have been known to provide a compliment to the host country through their fashions and Her Majesty did not disappoint. As a matter of fact she could easily have blended in with the 100,000 flag-waving, revellers dressed in similar colors. I'll bet she doesn't have to worry about that very often.

To signal her arrival The Queen's Personal Canadian Flag was flown from the Peace Tower at Parliament Hill as she took the salute, inspected a Guard of Honor and watched a 21-gun salute, a fly-past and a march-past.

Great Britain's Queen Elizabeth speaks to a crowd of over 70, 000 people after she and Prince Philip arrived at Parliament Hill as guests of honor for Canada Day celebrations in Ottawa, Ontario, July 1, 2010. The royal couple are on day four of their nine day Royal Tour of Canada. UPI/Heinz Ruckemann Photo via Newscom
During her speech, which she made in both English and French she praised Canada's 'warmth and enthusiasm" and made reference to the Vancouver Olympics and the gold-medal win for Canada's hockey team.

On day five of the tour, which was meant to be her day-off, The Queen met privately with Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff at Rideau Hall. Mr Ignatieff had this to say after his meeting with her “I have to be discreet. She’s the Queen. I can’t share what she said other than to say she has a magnificent sense of humour and sense of the absurd,” he said.

Oh, if only to have been a fly on the wall...

© Marilyn Braun 2010

Saturday, July 03, 2010

The Royal Tour of Canada 2010 - Day Three

Day Three of the Queen and Prince Philip's royal tour marked their arrival in our nations capital - Ottawa, Ontario.
OTTAWA, ON - JUNE 30: Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh meets children as he visits the Canadian Museum of Nature on June 30, 2010 in Ottawa, Canada. The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are on an eight day tour of Canada starting in Halifax and finishing in Toronto. The trip is to celebrate the centenary of the Canadian Navy and to mark Canada Day. On July 6th The royal couple will make their way to New York where the Queen will address the UN and visit Ground Zero. (Photo by Chris Jackson-Pool/Getty Images) It must have seemed like a regular day at the office, what with all of the plaques, windows and statues she unveiled. The first unveiling took place during a visit to the Canadian Museum of Nature where she unveiled a plaque dedicating The Queen's Lantern. This glass addition replaces the original tower of the Victoria Memorial Museum Building, built in 1910 to house this natural history museum, a 100 year-old building, designated a national historic site. The Lantern is dedicated to The Queen and her great-great-grandmother, Queen Victoria, after whom the building was named.

Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Canada's Heritage Minister James Moore unveil a statue of Canadian jazz pianist Oscar Peterson at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa June 30, 2010.   REUTERS/Blair Gable   (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS ROYALS) After a short walkabout the couple arrived at the National Arts Centre to unveil a life-sized bronze statue of the late-jazz- legend Oscar Peterson, who played for the Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh during the 2002 Golden Jubilee celebrations in Toronto.

Her visit to Rideau Hall marks the second tree-planting of the tour. Rideau Hall is the official residence of the Governor General of Canada and the tree that the Queen planted, her fifth at Rideau Hall, is one of 120 trees planted by members of the Royal Family, heads of state and other dignitaries. A bronze plaque at the base of each tree indicates the name and title of the person who planted it and the species and date.

The last unveiling takes after her audience with Prime Minister Stephen Harper. She unveils the design for the Diamond Jubilee Window for the Senate of Canada, the upper chamber of the Parliament of Canada.  The Window will commemorate Her Majesty’s 60 years of service as Queen, to be celebrated in 2012, and that of Queen Victoria’s, celebrated in 1897.

The Queen also unveiled a design for a carving of The Queen for the Senate Foyer. This image of The Queen will be installed alongside the other five of Canada’s sovereigns (Victoria, Edward VII, George V, Edward VIII and George VI) who have reigned since Confederation.

© Marilyn Braun 2010